November 2017 Newsletter

November in the Playroom

Every so often the playroom receives a toy that captivates the imagination and interest of many children. Recently a rather large fire station was donated.  Immediately upon seeing this toy, we knew we had to bring it into the playroom.  The children were fascinated with the new addition and plenty of play followed.  To add to their experience, we ensured that several fire fighters were available as well as a collection of fire trucks and of course fire helmets for the children to wear.  By including animals and trains, the children were also able to add their own ideas to the play.  Even a red pepper shaker often found its way to the fire station, likely as a hydrant – or so we assumed.  The fire station has now been put away to allow for some “new” toys to be rotated into play.  This helps to ensure that the playroom continues to provide new and interesting activities for the children. But have no fear, the fire station will come out again.

Music Circle

On Mondays at 11:30 a music therapist comes and leads parents and children in a ½ hour of singing and stories. Children learn songs, do a little dancing and make a lot of wonderful noise.

Wiggle, Giggle and Munch

Wednesday mornings from 10 – 12 we have Wiggle, Giggle & Munch for children who are into movement. The morning includes physical activities, a craft, circle time and a nutritious snack. November dates are the 1st, 8th, 15th, 22nd and 29th. All our programs are run on a drop-in basis. You do not have to pre-register. Just come on the days that work for you and your family. For more information, please call us at 204-788-8055.

Transitions

– Melinda Douglass, Laurie Leinwand, Marni Amsellem, Deanna Daniels

Adjusting to change can be difficult, as even positive life transitions tend to cause some stress. Over the course of a lifetime, a person can expect to experience a significant amount of change. Some of these changes, such as marriages, births, and new jobs, are generally positive, although they may be accompanied by their own unique stressors. Other major life transitions, such as moving, retirement, or entering the “empty nest” phase of life may cause a significant amount of stress. Those who find themselves experiencing difficulty coping with life transitions may find it helpful to speak to a therapist in order to become better able to adjust to changes they cannot control.

Transitions

– Melinda Douglass, Laurie Leinwand, Marni Amsellem, Deanna Daniels

Adjusting to change can be difficult, as even positive life transitions tend to cause some stress. Over the course of a lifetime, a person can expect to experience a significant amount of change. Some of these changes, such as marriages, births, and new jobs, are generally positive, although they may be accompanied by their own unique stressors. Other major life transitions, such as moving, retirement, or entering the “empty nest” phase of life may cause a significant amount of stress. Those who find themselves experiencing difficulty coping with life transitions may find it helpful to speak to a therapist in order to become better able to adjust to changes they cannot control.

How Can Change Be Beneficial?

Certain changes, such as entering school, starting a new job, or starting a family, can often be exciting, even when they cause some amount of stress, because they are generally considered to be positive changes. Many people look forward to obtaining a degree, rising in their chosen field, or having a home and family.

Changes, and especially difficult changes, can influence personal growth, and dealing with a change successfully may leave one stronger, more confident, and better prepared for what comes next in life. In other words, even those changes that are neither expected nor wanted might still produce some beneficial outcome.

Change can encourage the development of skills or knowledge, and might also bring about greater awareness of a condition or group. For example, the family of a person diagnosed with schizophrenia might become more aware of severe mental health conditions and their effects. Or the parents of a child who comes out as gay might become interested in LGBTQIA issues and equal rights and work to increase awareness. Change can also make clear what is important in one’s life and allow for greater self-discovery and self-awareness.